The Scholarly Communications Forum was sponsored by the University Libraries and the Office of the General Counsel from 2007-2012 to provide events to educate and engage the Carnegie Mellon community in scholarly communications issues.  The events were video recorded for later viewing and are available below.  The Forum has been replaced by Open Access Week events, the Scholarly Communications Digest, and the campaign to #OpenCMU.

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Carnegie Mellon's Robert Pego (Department of Mathematical Sciences) and Jeremy Avigad (Departments of Philosophy and Mathematical Sciences) participate in a panel discussion of current issues in scholarly publishing.

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Shawn Martin, Scholarly Communication Librarian
Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania

ABSTRACT

The possibilities of putting graduate research online are endless. Now from the comfort of their dorm rooms, students can market themselves for jobs, receive solicitations from publishers interested in their ideas, and increase the profile of themselves and their departments.

Nonetheless, they also lose much of the control they once had over print publications, open themselves up to possible plagiarism from rivals, and may actually be jeopardizing their chances for future tenure and promotion. The University of Pennsylvania recently created an option for graduate students to submit their dissertations in an open access website, ScholarlyCommons, and many of these challenges have come to the fore.

Graduate students, and more importantly their advisors, need to be made aware of the issues of publishing online, and need to carefully consider their options to best disseminate their work.

BIO

Shawn Martin is Scholarly Communication Librarian at the Van Pelt Library of the University of Pennsylvania. He has a BA in history from Ohio State University and an MA in history from the College of William and Mary. He has worked for several years in digital libraries including the Digital Library Project at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, the Ohio Memory Project at the Ohio Historical Society, and, most recently, the Text Creation Partnership at the University of Michigan. Shawn is also active in several library and scholarly associations and serves as the Executive Director of the American Association for History and Computing.

Carnegie Mellon's Institutional Repository

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Dan Hood, Research Showcase Outreach Coordinator
Carnegie Mellon University Libraries

ABSTRACT

Dan Hood defines "institutional repository" (IR), covers the history of IRs, and highlights notable advances in open access publishing relating to IRs.  The presentation includes a demonstration of Carnegie Mellon’s new institutional repository, a progress report, and discussion of future directions for the repository and related services. This event will be of interest to faculty, graduate students and anyone contributing the university's research output.

BIO

Prior to becoming CMU's Research Showcase Outreach Coordinator, Dan Hood served as the University Libraries' Information Literacy Fellow. Through his experience as a librarian at Carnegie Mellon, he has gained a deep understanding of Carnegie Mellon's research landscape while working directly with faculty and graduate students in their teaching and research endeavors. Dan holds a master's degree in library and information science from the University of Pittsburgh.

Panel Discussion

Four Carnegie Mellon professors cover the latest open access news and lead discussion about the future of open access in chemistry

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BIOS

Jay Apt is Executive Director of the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business where he is an Associate Research Professor and the CMU Department of Engineering and Public Policy, where he is a Distinguished Service Professor. He received an A.B .in physics from Harvard College in 1971 and a Ph.D. in experimental atomic physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976. His research, teaching and consulting interests are in economics, engineering, and public policy aspects of the electricity industry, economics of technical innovation, management of technical enterprises, risk management in policy and technical decision framing, and engineering systems design. Recent publication include, “Promoting Low-Carbon Electricity Production”, “Storing Syngas Lowers the Carbon Price for Profitable Coal Gasification”, “The Spectrum of Power from Wind Turbines”, “The Character of Power Output from Utility-Scale PV Systems”, “Should a Coal-Fired Power Plant be Retrofitted or Replaced?”, “Economics of Electric Energy Storage for Energy Arbitrage and Regulation in New York”, “Power and People”, “Deregulation Has Not Lowered US Industrial Electricity Prices” , and "Electrical Blackouts: A Systemic Problem." He has co-authored with Lester Lave op-ed pieces for the New York Times and the Washington Post. A former NASA Astronaut, he flew four missions aboard the U.S. Space Shuttles Atlantis and Endeavour. He received the NASA Distinguished Service Medal in 1997and the Metcalf Lifetime Achievement Award for significant contributions to engineering in 2002.

David Dzombak is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. The emphasis of his research and teaching is on water quality engineering and environmental remediation. At Carnegie Mellon he is Associate Dean for Graduate and Faculty Affairs for the College of Engineering, and Faculty Director of the Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research. Dr. Dzombak is an Associate Editor of Environmental Science & Technology (2005-present), a leading journal in environmental science and engineering that is published by the American Chemical Society. He has also served as an Associate Editor for Water Environment Research (1993-1998), published by the Water Environment Federation, and Ground Water (1991-1993), which is published by the National Ground Water Association.

Hyung Kim is professor and head of the Chemistry department. His research centers on theoretical understanding of condensed-phase chemical processes, or the chemistry and physics of free energetics, dynamics and related spectroscopy.

David Yaron teaches chemistry and leads the Yaron Research Group. Research focuses on the theoretical description of the photophysics of conjugated polymers and other organic semiconductors, to better understand the electronic structure theory of large systems.

Peter Suber
Senior Researcher at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

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BIO

Dr. Suber will describe open access, the simple idea with complex ramifications that is transforming the dissemination of science and scholarship. He'll discuss some of its history, including its recent successes, and explain why it's compatible with peer review, how we'll pay for it, why it doesn't violate copyright law, and why it will benefit authors at least as much as readers. Co-sponsored by Authors' Rights & Wrongs, Digital Libraries Colloquium, and Carnegie Mellon's University Lectures Series.

Dr. Suber is Senior Researcher at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), the Open Access Project Director at Public Knowledge, and a Research Professor of Philosophy at Earlham College. He has a Ph.D. in philosophy and a J.D., both from Northwestern University. He writes the Open Access News weblog and the SPARC Open Access Newsletter, was the principal drafter of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, and sits on the Advisory Board of The European Library, the Advisory Board of the Wikimedia Foundation, the Steering Committee of the Scientific Information Working Group of the U.N. World Summit on the Information Society, and the boards of several other groups devoted to open access, scholarly communication, and the information commons. He has been active in promoting open access for many years through his research, speaking, and writing. For more information, see his home page.

Explore the future of copyright with international experts on the subject. This session was offered in conjunction with the 3rd International Conference on the Universal Digital Library (ICUDL 2007), hosted by Carnegie Mellon University Libraries and the School of Computer Science.

Forum on International Initiatives on Copyright

John Ockerbloom, moderator
N. Balakrishnan
Ismail Serageldin
Michael Shamos

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BIOS

Prof. N. Balakrishnan received his B.E (Hons.) in Electronics and Communication from the Coimbatore Institute of Technology, University of Madras in 1972 and Ph.D. from the Indian Institute of Science in 1979. He then joined the Department of Aerospace Engineering as an Assistant Professor. He is currently the Associate Director of the Indian Institute of Science and a Professor at the Department of Aerospace Engineering and at the Supercomputer Education and Research Centre.His areas of research include Numerical Electromagnetics, High Performance Computing and Networks, Polarimetric Radars and Aerospace Electronic Systems, Information Security, Digital Library and Speech processing. He has received many awards including the Padmashree by the President of India, 2002, Homi J. Bhabha Award For Applied Sciences, 2004 and the Alumni Award for excellence in Research for Science & Engineering by IISc, 2001. He was the NRC Senior Resident Research Associate at the National Severe Storms Lab., Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A. from 1987-1989. He was a visiting research scientist at the University of Oklahoma in 1990, Colorado State University in 1991 and a Visiting Professor, Carnegie Mellon University since 2000. He is an Honorary Professor in Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) and National Institute of Advanced Studies. He is a Fellow of the Third World Academy of Sciences, Indian National Science Academy (currently the Vice President), Indian Academy of Sciences (currently the Treasurer), Indian National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Sciences and Institution of Electronics & Telecommunication Engineers. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee to the Cabinet (SAC-C). He is the editor of Int. Journal of Computational Science and Engineering and the International Journal on Distributed Sensor Networks.. He is a consultant to several Defence and Governmental Agencies. He is one of the Directors of Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) and TICEL Bio Park, Director of CDOT- Alcatel Research Centre at Chennai, a member of the Council of CDAC, and member of the council of many universities and CSIR Laboratories.

Dr. John Mark Ockerbloom is a Digital Library Architect and Planner at the University of Pennsylvania. He researches and develops new technology for digital library applications, in conjunction with Library staff, and with computing and library professionals in Penn's Computer and Information Science department and in other institutions. He earneed his Bachelor of Science, summa cum laude, with distinction in computer science at Yale University, and his Master's and doctorate in computer science at Carnegie Mellon.

Dr. Ismail Serageldin is the Director of the newly established Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt, and chairs the Boards of Directors for each of the seven research institutes and three museums affiliated to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Previously he served as Vice President of the World Bank (1992-2000), Chairman of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR, 1994-2000), Chairman of the Consultative Group to Assist the Poorest (CGAP), a micro-finance program (1995-2000), Chairman of the Global Water Partnership (GWP, 1996-2000), and Chairman of the World Commission for Water in the 21st Century (1998-2000). Dr. Serageldin worked in a number of capacities at the World Bank (1972-2000) and has published and lectured widely. He holds a Bachelor of Science in engineering degree from Cairo University, and a Masters' degree and a Ph.D. from Harvard University and has received 15 honorary doctorates. Dr. Serageldin currently serves as Distinguished Professor at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and as chair and member of a number of advisory committees for academic, research, scientific, and international institutions and civil-society efforts. He has written more than 50 books and monographs (edited or authored) and 200 articles, book chapters, and technical papers on various topics.

Dr. Michael I. Shamos is Distinguished Career Professor in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, where he directs the eBusiness Technology degree program and serves as a Director of the Universal Library, sponsor of the Million Book Project. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Hong Kong. Dr. Shamos has lectured extensively on the implications of copyright on digital collections. Dr. Shamos holds seven university degrees in such fields as physics, computer science, technology of management and law. He has been associated with Carnegie Mellon since 1975. He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Yale and law degree from Duquesne University. Since 1980, he has served as examiner of electronic voting systems for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Dr. Shamos has been an intellectual property attorney since 1981, concentrating in computer-related patent and copyright matters. He is admitted to the bar of six courts and the United States Patent and Trademark Office. He has been an expert witness in recent Internet cases involving the Motion Picture Association of America and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Reflections on Why Copyright Law Must Change

Ismail Serageldin
Director, Bibliotheca Alexandrina

This presentation was given in conjunction with the 3rd International Conference on the Universal Digital Library (ICUDL 2007), hosted by Carnegie Mellon University Libraries and the School of Computer Science.

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BIO

Dr. Ismail Serageldin is the Director of the newly established Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt, and chairs the Boards of Directors for each of the seven research institutes and three museums affiliated to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Previously he served as Vice President of the World Bank (1992-2000), Chairman of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR, 1994-2000), Chairman of the Consultative Group to Assist the Poorest (CGAP), a micro-finance program (1995-2000), Chairman of the Global Water Partnership (GWP, 1996-2000), and Chairman of the World Commission for Water in the 21st Century (1998-2000). Dr. Serageldin worked in a number of capacities at the World Bank (1972-2000) and has published and lectured widely. He holds a Bachelor of Science in engineering degree from Cairo University, and a Masters' degree and a Ph.D. from Harvard University and has received 15 honorary doctorates. Dr. Serageldin currently serves as Distinguished Professor at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and as chair and member of a number of advisory committees for academic, research, scientific, and international institutions and civil-society efforts. He has written more than 50 books and monographs (edited or authored) and 200 articles, book chapters, and technical papers on various topics.

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Dr. Kenneth Crews, Director
Copyright Management Center, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

ABSTRACT 

Copyright law has important and immediate consequences for all research and teaching at the university. Copyright law gives instant and automatic protection to the new works we create, and to the materials we find on the Internet, in the library, and through digital databases. The law grants rights, but the law also allows "fair use" of protected works. This session will be a wide-ranging exploration of issues of direct importance to academic work. It will also be a chance to explore creative options that can better serve your needs. Bring your questions, and expect a lively and productive discussion!

BIO

Recently appointed Director of Columbia University’s new Copyright Advisory Office, effective January 2008, Dr. Crews has a distinguished career in copyright and fair use issues. Since 1994, he has been a professor at the Indiana University School of Law–Indianapolis and the IU School of Library and Information Science. A faculty member of the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center since its founding in 2003, he previously practiced business and entertainment law in Los Angeles, and has taught and published widely on copyright, constitutional law, political history, and library science. His work has won wide acclaim, and he has been active in projects and initiatives on copyright law in the United States and around the world. His newest book, Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators, is widely used as a guide through the legal issues at numerous universities.

Crews earned a Ph.D. and M.L.S. from the Graduate School of Library & Information Science at the University of California, Los Angeles, a JD from Washington University, and his undergraduate history degree from Northwestern University. Since inception of the office in 1994, Crews has directed the Copyright Management Center, based at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Since 1996, he has held a chaired professorship in the IU School of Law-Indianapolis, in addition to a joint appointment in the IU School of Library and Information Science.

As Director of the Copyright Advisory Office at Columbia, Crews will serve as resource and advisor on the application of copyright policies to teaching and learning, research, and scholarly communication within the university.

Carnegie Mellon faculty members Jay Kadane, Barbara Johnstone, and David Danks talk about why they self-archive, the tools they use, the problems they have encountered and how they solved them, etc. The panelists' goal is to evoke a lively Q & A session with audience members.
 

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BIOS

Joseph B ("Jay") Kadane is Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Sciences, Emeritus. He has been at Carnegie Mellon since 1971, and served as Head of the Statistics Department from 1972 to 1981. Subsequently he served for 2.5 years as Chair of the Faculty Senate. His research interests center on statistical inference, both theoretically and in applications. Currently his applied work is in phylogenetics, marketing, internet security, and air pollution. He is finishing two books, one on statistics in the law, and the other on uncertainty.

David Danks is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University, and Director of the Laboratory for Empirical Approaches to Philosophy. He is also a (consulting) Research Scientist at the Institute for Human & Machine Cognition. His primary research interests are in cognitive science, philosophy of psychology, and machine learning.

Barbara Johnstone (PhD, University of Michigan) is Professor of Rhetoric and Linguistics at Carnegie Mellon University and editor of Language in Society. She is the author of Repetition in Arabic Discourse (Benjamins, 1990); Stories, Community, and Place: Narratives from Middle America (Indiana UP, 1990); The Linguistic Individual (Oxford, 1996); and two textbooks, Qualitative Methods in Sociolinguistics (Oxford, 2001) and Discourse Analysis (Blackwell, 2002), in addition to many articles and book chapters. Her recurrent interests have to do with how people evoke and shape places in talk and with what can be learned by taking the perspective of the individual on language and discourse. Her current work is about dialect and locality in the Pittsburgh (US) area.

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Julia Blixrud, Assistant Director for Public Programs
Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

ABSTRACT

Do authors know enough about their rights? Under copyright law, the author is the copyright holder unless or until copyright is transferred to someone else through a signed agreement. That transfer process doesn't have to be an all or nothing approach. As the copyright holder, authors can choose what rights to keep while still providing the necessary ability for a publisher or distributor to see that their work is given the visibility desired. New technologies have raised awareness of the importance of copyright and the options authors have for rights retention. Does an author want to make her work publicly available on a personal or institutional website?  Does he expect to reuse his work for another publication? Do authors know how to negotiate the necessary rights to ensure that the educational mission is met or research results are made known?  Hear how the copyright landscape is changing with the introduction of authors' addenda attached to publisher agreements and the initiation of large-scale efforts like Creative Commons and Science Commons that encourage authors to be the best advocates possible for managing their copyright.
 

BIO

Julia Blixrud is the Assistant Director for Public Programs for SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. Serving in that capacity since August 1999, she is implementing a grassroots educational and advocacy program directed to scientists and scholars, librarians, and society publishers.

In addition, Blixrud is Assistant Executive Director, External Relations for ARL, the Association of Research Libraries. She has served the Association in several capacities since December 1996 and is currently providing staff support for ARL's new Strategic Direction III: Research, Teaching, and Learning. Julia represents the Association at national and international meetings and events, participates in ARL's assessment and new measures activities, provides advice for ARL publications and communications, and conducts special projects. She is also staff to the Association's Membership Committee, the Visiting Program Officer program, and the Leadership Development Task Force. She has served as a faculty member for ARL's former Office of Leadership and Management Services, conducting workshops on facilitation, the culture of assessment, and leadership and management as well as providing consulting services for institutional planning and assessment.

Blixrud's 30-year career in the library community has included positions at CAPCON and MINITEX library networks, the Council on Library Resources, and the Library of Congress. Her interests and professional activities have included cooperative programs, serials, technical standards, library assessment, intellectual property, and scholarly communication. She has a BA in Library Science and Scandinavian Studies from Augsburg College in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and an MA in Library Science from the University of Minnesota.

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ABSTRACT

To advance in the academic world, faculty and graduate students must publish scholarly works. But technological innovation increasingly creates conflicts between scholars and their publishers. Can a professor post his article on his website? Can he distribute copies of the article to his class? Can he use elements of his article in new research? This workshop will explore the copyright issues that underlie these conflicts, and offer possible solutions.
 

BIOS

Mary Jo Dively is Vice President and General Counsel for Carnegie Mellon University, where she oversees the wide range of legal issues involving the university in Pennsylvania, nationally and abroad. Prior to joining Carnegie Mellon, she was in the private practice of law for nineteen years, most recently as partner in the national law firm, Reed Smith, as head of its Technology, Media and Communications Group. Dively received her B.A. and B.S. from the University of Kansas and her J.D. from the Vanderbilt University School of Law. She is a member of the American Law Institute; co-chairs the Information Transaction Committee of the American Bar Association; is one of Pennsylvania’s appointed Commissioners to the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws; is current Chair of the Board of Trustees of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh; and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the UPMC Health System where she serves on both the Executive Committee and the Information Technology Committee.

Jonathan Band is a copyright attorney in Washington, D.C. He represents Internet companies, library associations, and universities on copyright and other intellectual property matters. He is one of Carnegie Mellon's outside copyright advisors.

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Mark Kamlet
Provost, Carnegie Mellon University

ABSTRACT

Drawing on his academic training as an economist and on his service as an advisor for the National Institute of Health’s PubMedCentral, Provost Mark Kamlet will talk about the implications of digital alternatives for Carnegie Mellon faculty and graduate students. Faculty play many roles in creating, reviewing, and preserving new knowledge both through their research and through their service to discipline scholarly societies. Kamlet will discuss how to a new approach will increase impact of faculty work and achieve a more affordable future for the disciplines and for the university.
 

BIO

Mark S. Kamlet is Carnegie Mellon provost, senior vice president, and professor. He was recently appointed by the director of NIH to be a member of the Public Access Working Group, which will monitor the impact of open access to results of NIH-funded research. He is an expert in the economics of health care, quantitative methodology and public finance. He is on the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Board of the Institute of Medicine and has served in recent years on several expert consensus panels for the Centers for Disease Control, the Institute of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. He also has served as chairman of the board of Carnegie Learning and iCarnegie. Locally, Kamlet is on the board of directors of the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Consortium, the Institute for Transfusion Medicine, the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania, the Western Pennsylvania Hospital and Highmark Inc. Kamlet also serves on the Allegheny County Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Board.

Kamlet earned his undergraduate degree at Stanford University and his master's and doctor's degrees at the University of California at Berkeley.